Editorial Office

Naarden Vesting
Naarden Vesting (Photographer: Ianus/Flickr) (click-2-enlarge)

In the past couple of months time to write posts for Eikongraphia proved to be scarce. Long working weeks combined with packed weekends took their toll. Eikongraphia however is not dead. In the coming year I aim to pick up the pace again.

To start off the new series of posts I want tell a different story. I want to explain a little bit about my work outside of Eikongraphia. After graduating from the TU Delft two years ago I started working for Architectenweb, first as managing editor and later on also as publisher. My main involvement proved to be Architectenweb.nl, a Dutch online platform for architects, and AWM, a Dutch print magazine on contemporary architecture. This fall I have been asked to become editor-in-chief of Architectenweb.nl and AWM.

Architectenweb is a small cross media publisher in the fields of architecture and materials. The portfolio of Architectenweb include websites, print magazines, exhibitions and events. Some of you might know Materia.nl and Material Xperience. There was a small edition of Material Xperience at 100% Design London this year, a large edition is coming up in Rotterdam at the end of January. In the past years the company has grown quite rapidly. Architectenweb now employs about sixteen people, plus a couple of interns. Excluding myself, the editorial office now counts four editors. It is actually one of the bigger editorial offices involved in architecture in the Netherlands.

To get to the photograph above. Architectenweb currently keeps office in the city of Naarden, in the vicinity of Amsterdam. Naarden is what we in the Netherlands call a ‘vestingstad’. Onto the early sixties of the twentieth century the fortifications of Naarden were part of the national defense system of the country, fully set up in the nineteenth century. In case of a war a zone of polders from Naarden 85 kilometers to the south could rapidly be put under water. The idea was that this would significantly slow down an enemy approaching Amsterdam from the east. The last time the system was used was during the Second World War. By then it was already pretty outdated. The Nazi’s just flew over the water and dropped their soldiers at the other side of the water.

Related: CMYK 


About this entry