1111, by Herzog & de Meuron

Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron)
Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron) (click-2-enlarge)

They’re making their way through Miami, the Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron. They have been working a while now on the new Miami Art Museum, a bold reinterpretation of the classical Greek Temple. Now another design for Miami has been made public. Its name describes its location: 1111 Lincoln Road.

The project consists of two neighboring buildings. Both start with a commercial plinth, but the first continues as a fancy parking garage, while the second is topped with patio dwellings. Architect Jacques Herzog says about the building that it is “all muscle without clothing.” The project-website adds: ‘11 11 will reinterpret Tropical Modernism - crisp structures with ocean-liner planes – with an original modern twist’

What fascinates me about the project is its complete lack of density. Apparently there is no need to put the parking underground or any desire to stack dwellings; you can just make some patio houses. Advantage: you don’t need any windows above the commercial space. That would be too confusing anyway, it seems, the idea that people would actually live up there!

In Miami you can advertise though with parking space. It is exactly like the vast parking spaces around a suburban shopping mall. Only this time the parking is stacked. I wonder if has been stacked in this spacious way because Americans are not used to parking garages, or just because it creates a great spatial sequence.

When Le Corbusier drew his Domino House he actually drew the modern parking garage.

From ‘ElevenEleven’ on one could speculatively imagine a city made of building blocks like this: streets that belong to the shopping public, the space above reserved for parking. Eventually the parking garages will be interconnected to form roads that would directly link to the nearest highway.

For now, the idea of the parking garage as a representational façade is provoking enough. What city will be the first to copy this concept?

 

Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron)
Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron) (click-2-enlarge)

 

Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron)
Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron) (click-2-enlarge)

 

Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron)
Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron) (click-2-enlarge)

 

Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron)
Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron) (click-2-enlarge)

 

Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron)
Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron) (click-2-enlarge)

 

Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron)
Herzog & de Meuron - Eleven Eleven, Miami (Copyright Herzog & de Meuron) (click-2-enlarge)

1111 Lincoln Street will open this fall, it is said. A very basic video of the project can be seen on a dedicated website.

Related Herzog & de Meuron: Water, by Herzog & de Meuron; Drops, by Herzog & de Meuron;
Vitra, by Herzog & de Meuron; Pyramid, by Herzog & de Meuron; Birdsnest, by Herzog & de Meuron; Electric Spool, by Herzog & de Meuron; Aalto Vase, by Herzog & de Meuron

Related iconography: Shipdecks, by Chipperfield


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